Four Things I Learned About Myself from the Loss My Cat

IMG_6707Last month, I had to make the tough decision to euthanize my cat, Bella. In a span of two weeks, I went from discovering a tumor to administering medications to making the ultimate decision to let her go. We gave it the best fight, but you can’t always beat biology. During this two weeks, a friend asked me if I was planning to catalog this experience as it tied in so well to my year of strength theme. Now that the emotions are a little less raw, I thought I would share what I learned:

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Becoming Strong in 2018

It seems like every two years I find myself back here writing a post about new beginnings. I write that one post and then ghost my own website. I find that ghosting to be a representation of simply not having the heart or energy to post something meaningful. Hopefully, this will be the year that I don’t turn into a ghost.
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Earning My Wings in 2016

This past year, I fought a battle with unwanted house guests, made my first adult trip to the emergency room, and experienced more drama and transitions than I cared to. Thanks to these battles, I purged physical items, reevaluated my career goals and took a deep look at some of the relationships in my life. I feel much lighter and I’m grateful for the many learning experiences of 2015.

There is one thing that I will thank 2015 for: The Imerman Angels Brunch Run. Continue reading

Hitting the Reset Button

resetIt’s been a while since I’ve had the time to blog for myself. This year has been a whirlwind of change for me. In February, I was afforded the opportunity to make the transition into marketing that I had been hustling for. It’s always a big risk to leave behind the comfort of place where you’ve forged strong relationships, built trust and carved a place for yourself within the corporate dynamic. The risk was worth the potential reward. Continue reading

Support Your Network and a Stellar Indie Film

I’ve talked a lot in this blog about how important it is to have the support of your writing community and how important it is to support them. My personal writing network has cheered me on and supported me in all of the endeavors I have started in the past year and my ideas for the future.

Now it’s my turn to give back.

You all met her as Jamie Lee Scott back in December of last year when she was featured in my Seven Questions segment. Since then Jamie Livingston-Dierks has published another book in the Gotcha Detective Series, Textual Relations, and has written a short film.

No One Knows was written in a single sitting as the result of a single thought: “What could be the worst thing that could happen to you if you looked in the wrong window?” This led to another thought: “What would you do to keep your deep, dark secret?”

This led to the development of a screenplay:

A story about family, public perceptions, and secrets. What would you do to keep your secret? 

The Smiths could be any family. They could be your neighbors. When twelve-year old Jason looks in his neighbor’s window at , he learns he’s not the only kid living in an abusive environment. What he learns will change his life.

Now with a producer, director and cast in hand, No One Knows in the funding stages. If you love to support your fellow writers donate. If you love indie films donate. If you have a deep, dark secret donate. Every dollar will help make this awesome film possible. And if you can’t donate, spread the word about the film via Twitter and/or Facebook. To donate, head over to the Indiegogo page.

Thanks in advance to all of you who support this film and one of my biggest supporters.

Writing About Yourself is Hard

Writing about yourself stinks. And I don’t mean writing an autobiography. I’m talking about cover letters.

There’s a point in all of our lives, whether you are a writer or not, where you get bored with what you are doing and decide to throw yourself back out into the water with the sharks.

I’m at that point right now. I am not unhappy with all of the opportunities that have been afforded to me over the last year. I think they just pointed me down the right road after I was stuck at the fork. I want more of what I’m doing and I want it to be challenging.

It has been a while since I looked for a new position in the traditional manner. I’ve been lucky enough to have been referred for much of my work. Now I remember why I love referrals. You don’t need a cover letter.

I hate cover letters. I spend entirely too much time crafting these documents. Why is it so hard to talk about yourself? I think it’s the pressure that comes with this brag letter.

  1. Grammar and Spelling: In my full-time position, I see terrible misspellings, uses of the wrong word and just plain bad sentence structure. I think this has made me overly obsessed with perfection on cover letters.
  2. First Impressions: This cover letter is supposed to be a first impression snapshot of who you are as a person and what you and your skills can bring to an organization. Obviously you want to look good on paper. But if you look too good are you disqualifying yourself? If you don’t look good enough will they just delete your email?
  3. Length: The jury is still out on how long cover letters should be and where you should be attaching them electronically. The options vary based upon the method in which you are applying for a job. I find that I just have to use my best judgment, take a stab at it and hope for the best.
  4. Accomplishments: Sure you think something is a great accomplishment to brag about, but really, is it an accomplishment to the hiring executive?

I think we should do away with cover letters all together. Just look at my resume and bring me in to talk to you face-to-face. I’m much better talking about myself when I’m in front of someone else who is asking me what they really care about, not about what I think they care about.

Do you hate writing cover letters? What challenges have they brought you and have you found ways to overcome them?