It’s All About a Schedule

Since I’ve taken on this new project, I’ve realized that now more than ever I need to make myself a schedule. I talked a bit about the balance  in my Balancing Multiple Hats post. This contact position is more content and social media heavy than I have taken on prior, but I’m ready for the challenge and I think that the key to success is how I schedule my time.

While the time I have to write varies daily, I’ve sat down and made myself tangible goals to ensure I complete my tasks and that I’ve made the progress I need to stay on track.

  • Writing Sprints: The best thing about Twitter is having a strong community of writers on my side. I completed my first of what will probably many more with the help of Jeanne (@jeannevb). Tuning out of social networks for a while and keeping the TV turned off resulted in a quite productive hour.
  • Google Calendar: I am a huge fan of my tiny little pocket purse planner. I’ve decided to move into the technical age and input all of my meetings into the Google calendar that syncs with my Android. The automatic reminders of meetings are helpful.
  • A Blank Journal: I love having one of these with me to write down my notes about a project, keep track of information and have with me at all times to write outlines and ideas on for pieces. It’s a great compact item to have with me during my commute because it fits in my bag. It enables me to utilize available time during a commute.

What are your favorite tools and tips that you use when you are working on a project? Give me some ideas in the comments!

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Why It’s Important to Stay in Touch with Your Network

In an earlier post, I talked about the importance of having a strong network and how my network has helped me gain new experiences. Yesterday, my network helped be secure a new contract position that has the potential to move my career in a new direction.
 
While my skill set, experience and desire to learn and write secured the offer (in my opinion), I would have never have found out about the opportunity without the help of Samantha, my former editor at Center Square Journal. She recommended me for this position and connected me with the right parties.  As a result, I interviewed and secured a new contract opportunity that has the potential to fulfill the desires I shared with you in my last post
 
I spent a lot of time this wk pimping friends & recommending them for paid gigs. We shld all do this more. @jeannevb
 
Keep in contact with your network and pay it forward. You never know if you can help enhance someones career by recommending them for opportunities. It can make a world of difference to them.
 

Taking Risks

I’ve been thinking a lot lately about my writing career. I’ve been starting to formulate a plan for the direction I’d like to take next year. But a lot of it involves taking risks.

I’ve been toying about working for myself or working contract projects and then moving on. The idea of working for myself and controlling what kind of writing I do is an appealing idea. I’d be working more, but heck, it would be for something I 100% enjoy doing.

I would love to write a children’s book and I’d love to do NaNoWriMo. Those things involve time that I haven’t figured out how to incorporate into my schedule.

There is not enough time in the day to pursue the writing I’d like to do and that’s why working for myself seems like a great option.

But then my rational side kicks in. Why would I not want to have full-time job that provides some sort of security? What if I go out on my own and something happens and I can’t pay my bills?

I know a lot of people who are working for themselves and there’s a divide. Have any of you taken the risk and gone out on your own? What were your experiences? Were they worth it?