Support Your Network and a Stellar Indie Film

I’ve talked a lot in this blog about how important it is to have the support of your writing community and how important it is to support them. My personal writing network has cheered me on and supported me in all of the endeavors I have started in the past year and my ideas for the future.

Now it’s my turn to give back.

You all met her as Jamie Lee Scott back in December of last year when she was featured in my Seven Questions segment. Since then Jamie Livingston-Dierks has published another book in the Gotcha Detective Series, Textual Relations, and has written a short film.

No One Knows was written in a single sitting as the result of a single thought: “What could be the worst thing that could happen to you if you looked in the wrong window?” This led to another thought: “What would you do to keep your deep, dark secret?”

This led to the development of a screenplay:

A story about family, public perceptions, and secrets. What would you do to keep your secret? 

The Smiths could be any family. They could be your neighbors. When twelve-year old Jason looks in his neighbor’s window at , he learns he’s not the only kid living in an abusive environment. What he learns will change his life.

Now with a producer, director and cast in hand, No One Knows in the funding stages. If you love to support your fellow writers donate. If you love indie films donate. If you have a deep, dark secret donate. Every dollar will help make this awesome film possible. And if you can’t donate, spread the word about the film via Twitter and/or Facebook. To donate, head over to the Indiegogo page.

Thanks in advance to all of you who support this film and one of my biggest supporters.

Advertisements

Book Review: Textual Relations by Jamie Lee Scott

The following review originally appeared on Book End Babes, a website devoted to a love of reading and to learning about new authors.

For those of you have been reading BEB for a while, you know that a few months back I reviewed Jamie Lee Scott’s Let Us Prey. This novel was the first of the Gotcha Detective Agency Mysteries.

I was lucky enough to be a beta reader for Textual Relations, but before I tell you about it, you need to read the synopsis!

Mimi Capurro, owner of Gotcha Detective Agency, hasn’t seen her old college flame since they teamed up to find a killer several months earlier. Now, after breaking and entering into an alleged predator’s home, Mimi and Charles find a murder victim on the floor in his bedroom. When homicide detective Nick Christianson and his new partner, Piper Mason, arrive on the scene, this is not the way Mimi expected to see Nick again.

Even though it’s his job, Nick is loath to find the killer. That is until a teenage girl with ties to the victim disappears. Now Mimi, Nick and Charles race against the clock to find the killer and hopefully find the girl in the process.

I cannot praise this book enough! One always worries about the sophomore book in the series, but Jamie brings it. I absolutely loved the story line. It’s timely, well researched and written from an interesting perspective.

All of my favorite characters are back and the role of Charles is even bigger. He is one of my favorite characters of the Gotcha agency! He’s sassy, nosy and tells it like it is! I love that Jamie has developed his character to have some new depth.

We also get to meet some new characters throughout the course of the novel, some who I can see playing a huge role in the next book. I absolutely adore Nick’s new partner Piper and the affect she has on Mimi.

And for those of you who love Mimi and Nick, the tension is back! They have the tension of ABC’s Castle and Beckett and in Textual Relations things start to heat up again! Mimi gets to see a new side of Nick and comes to a big realization about what she feels in her heart.

And the end! What a teaser! You’ll be screaming really, c’mon, I want to know where this is going now! But, like me, you’ll just have to be patient.

If you haven’t read Let Us Prey, I highly recommend that you read that before diving into Textual Relations, but it’s not necessary. It’s a great read too!

How many of you like to read mystery series? What’s your favorite?